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Tender and juicy, this Dutch oven pot roast transforms an affordable cut of meat into a delicious comfort food dinner. The beef slowly bakes with potatoes and carrots for an easy one pot meal. Your whole family will love this classic Sunday pot roast recipe!

Overhead shot of a Dutch oven pot roast
Table of Contents
  1. How to Make Pot Roast in a Dutch Oven | 1-Minute Video
  2. What is a Dutch Oven Pot Roast?
  3. Ingredients
  4. How to Make a Dutch Oven Pot Roast
  5. Serving Suggestions
  6. Preparation and Storage Tips
  7. Recipe Variations
  8. Tips for the Best Pot Roast Recipe
  9. Dutch Oven Pot Roast Recipe

If you love using your Dutch oven for cozy dinner recipes as much as we do, be sure to try this Dutch oven beef stew, these rich braised beef short ribs, a crisp and juicy Dutch oven chicken, and a Dutch oven pork roast with gravy, too!

How to Make Pot Roast in a Dutch Oven | 1-Minute Video

Nothing beats the cozy comfort of a fall-apart tender Dutch Oven Pot Roast with potatoes and carrots. The aroma that wafts through your home as it cooks all afternoon is like a warm hug from your grandmother! This melt-in-your-mouth easy dinner recipe gives you succulent beef and flavorful vegetables that have soaked up all of the juices from the meat. It’s truly the perfect supper to serve on a quiet Sunday evening.

Hands holding a Dutch oven with a pot roast inside

What is a Dutch Oven Pot Roast?

A “pot roast” is a braised beef dish that’s made by searing a big, tough cut of beef (usually an inexpensive roast) and then slowly cooking the beef in a covered dish called a Dutch oven. In America, this dish is often called a “Yankee Pot Roast,” and is served with carrots and potatoes or other vegetables. Slowly roasting a tough cut tenderizes the meat, resulting in succulent beef and rich liquid that’s perfect for gravy.

This particular Dutch oven pot roast recipe works so well because you wait to add the potatoes to the pot during the final 45 minutes so that they don’t get overcooked and mushy. The vegetables, beef, and herbs flavor the rich juices that are further enhanced by a touch of red wine.

Browning chuck roast in a dutch oven

The Best Meat for Pot Roast

Chuck roast is a very common cut for a juicy pot roast in the oven, but you can also use a brisket or a round roast.

A boneless chuck roast (or a bone-in chuck roast, if you can find it) is my first choice for a pot roast. It has great marbling, making the roast tender and juicy when braised. Chuck roast is cut from the shoulder just above the short rib, so it’s tougher (and therefore more affordable) than those cut from the front part of the animal, like the sirloin or short loin.

Deglazing pot with beef broth

Why use a Dutch Oven for a Pot Roast?

Many folks prefer the convenience of a Crock Pot slow cooker or even an Instant Pot, but I find that the Dutch oven yields the best tasting pot roast every time.

Dutch ovens are made from cast iron, so they retain and evenly distribute the heat. Plus, the tight-fitting lid traps the moisture inside the pot — resulting in the juiciest pot roast that you will ever taste. Instead of a dried-out piece of beef that has been cooked to death in a slow cooker, you can easily control the cooking time of both the beef and the potatoes when using a Dutch oven. It’s the way to go!

The Best Dutch Oven to Use for Pot Roast

We rounded up the best Dutch ovens you can buy, including 3 (yes, 3!) that I personally own and love! It was difficult to choose my favorite, but the Staub Cast Iron Dutch Oven (5.5 quarts) earned the top spot. You can buy it on Amazon for $311.50 or at Walmart for $379.95. That said, the Le Creuset Enameled Cast Iron Dutch oven was a close second that’s just a little bit larger (7.5 quarts). It’s available on Amazon for $459.95.

Adding vegetables to a Dutch oven

Ingredients

This is just a quick overview of the ingredients that you need for a juicy pot roast in the oven. As always, specific measurements and step-by-step cooking instructions are included in the printable recipe box at the bottom of the post.

  • Boneless beef chuck roast: a 3-pound roast is the perfect piece of meat here, but you can use a different beef roast instead, such as a brisket or a round roast.
  • All-purpose flour: to dredge the meat, which helps it brown and develop a nice crust when seared. The flour also adds body to the finished sauce.
  • Butter and olive oil: for searing the meat.
  • Onions, carrots, celery, and garlic: fresh veggies that add a lot of savory flavor to the pot.
  • Beef broth: the liquid that braises the meat and veggies and keeps everything really moist.
  • Red wine: adds more depth of flavor to the pot roast. For an alcohol-free meal, substitute additional beef broth for the red wine. You might also like to add a splash of Worcestershire sauce or balsamic vinegar.
  • Thyme, rosemary, and bay leaves: for even more flavor! Fresh herbs are always my preference, but you can use dried herbs in a pinch.
  • Russet potatoes: wait to stir them into the pot towards the end of the cooking time so that they don’t get too mushy. You can substitute with Yukon gold potatoes, if you like. If using the gold potatoes, there’s no need to peel them before adding them to the pot.
  • Kosher salt and ground black pepper: to enhance the other flavors in the dish.
Peeling russet potatoes

How to Make a Dutch Oven Pot Roast

While you need to allow plenty of time for the braising process, this easy one-pot meal is almost entirely hands-off. So get it going in the oven, and then put your feet up and enjoy the afternoon. Your delicious oven baked chuck roast recipe will be ready and waiting for you by dinnertime!

  1. Sear the Roast. Dredge the beef in seasoned flour and then brown it in olive oil and butter in a large Dutch oven on the stove top on both sides. Remove the meat to a plate.
  2. Deglaze the Pot and Sauté the Vegetables. Add one cup of the beef broth to the pot and use a wooden spoon to scrape up the bits from the bottom of the pan. These browned bits add great flavor to the liquid in the pot. Then add the onions, carrots, celery and garlic to the pot, cooking and stirring for about 10 minutes.
  3. Return Roast and Remaining Ingredients to the Pot. Once the onions are translucent, place the roast on top of the vegetables, add the remaining broth, along with the red wine, thyme, rosemary and bay leaves.
  4. Bake. Season with salt and pepper, cover the Dutch oven, and bake in a 275°F oven for 2 hours.
  5. Add the Potatoes. While the beef is in the oven, peel and dice the potatoes. After 2 hours, add the potatoes to the pot, mixing them into the liquid.
  6. Finish Baking. Cover the pot again and return it to the oven to continue baking for an additional 45 minutes – 1 hour (or until the potatoes are soft and the roast is fall-apart tender).
Side shot of a Sunday pot roast dinner on a table

Serving Suggestions

When the beef is done it will be fall-apart tender. You can pull it with a fork, but you don’t even really need to! It will melt in your mouth on its own. You can serve the beef, potatoes, and vegetables on their own, or pair them with any of these additional sides:

Overhead shot of hands serving a Dutch oven pot roast

Preparation and Storage Tips

  • Prep Ahead and Reheat: If you prepare the roast a day ahead, cover and refrigerate it overnight. The next day, skim off any solidified fat and reheat it gently in a warm oven or over low heat on the stovetop.
  • Store leftover pot roast in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 3 days.
  • Wrapped tightly, you can freeze leftovers pot roast. The meat will keep in the freezer for up to 2 months. I don’t recommend freezing the cooked vegetables or potatoes; however. They tend to have a mushy and watery texture when thawed.
Square overhead image of a Dutch oven pot roast

Recipe Variations

  • Omit the potatoes in your pot, and instead serve the finished dish over a plate of mashed potatoes instead.
  • Most grocery stores sell boneless chuck roasts that weigh about 3 pounds. Those are perfect for this recipe! I have also used a 4-lb. bone-in chuck roast from a local farm, which requires about the same cooking time as a 3-lb. boneless roast. The bone adds a lot of rich flavor to the juices in the pot, but the bone-in chuck roasts are harder to find in stores. If you use larger boneless roasts (such as 4-5 lbs.), you’ll need to increase the cooking time by about 1 hour.
  • I love the added depth of flavor that you get from the red wine; however, you can substitute with additional beef broth or beef stock in lieu of the red wine.
  • Make a gravy using the drippings from the pot. To do so, melt 2 tablespoons of butter in a skillet over medium heat. Whisk in 2 tablespoons of flour and cook for 30 seconds, stirring constantly. While continually whisking, gradually add 1 – 1 ½ cups of strained juices/drippings from the pot until the gravy reaches the desired consistency. Continue whisking while the gravy bubbles and cooks for 1-2 minutes. Season with additional salt and pepper, to taste.
Close up side shot of a dutch oven pot roast in a blue pot

Tips for the Best Pot Roast Recipe

  • Use a heavy cast iron Dutch oven (I like this great investment piece by Le Creuset) or another heavy oven-safe pot with a tight-fitting lid. Simply covering a dish with aluminum foil is not ideal.
  • Sear the meat and get some really nice color on it before you begin the slow braising process. The caramelized surface of the meat will give the dish rich flavor and the browning process will help to lock in the juices. Dredging the meat in the flour before browning adds body to the finished sauce.
  • Why is my pot roast tough? Undercooked pot roast will be tough and chewy. If you’re using tougher or bigger cuts of beef (other than a chuck roast), you may need to increase the cooking time to give the meat fibers plenty of time to break down and become tender and juicy.
  • Why is my pot roast dry? Cooking the meat for too long can result in a dry pot roast. This often happens when you use appliances like the Crock Pot or Instant Pot. Another reason the Dutch oven method is so great!
Close overhead image of a Dutch oven pot roast

More Pot Roast Recipes to Try

Crock Pot Pot Roast

8 hours hrs 55 minutes mins

Mississippi Pot Roast {Crock Pot, Oven, Instant Pot}

3 hours hrs 40 minutes mins

Stovetop Pot Roast and Gravy

3 hours hrs 45 minutes mins

Square overhead featured image of a dutch oven pot roast

Dutch Oven Pot Roast

4.73 from 81 votes
Prep: 15 minutes
Cook: 3 hours 25 minutes
0 minutes
Total: 3 hours 40 minutes
Servings 8 people
Calories 385 kcal
Tender and juicy, this Dutch oven pot roast recipe transforms an affordable cut of meat into a delicious comfort food dinner!

Ingredients
  

  • cup all-purpose flour
  • Kosher salt and ground black pepper, to taste
  • 1 (3 lb.) boneless chuck roast
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 onions, thinly sliced
  • 5 carrots, peeled and cut into 2-inch pieces
  • 4 large ribs celery, cut into ½-inch crescents
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 3 cups beef broth, divided
  • ½ cup red wine (or additional beef broth)
  • 2 sprigs fresh thyme (or ¼ teaspoon dried)
  • 2 sprigs fresh rosemary (or ¼ teaspoon dried)
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 3 medium Russet potatoes, peeled and cut into eighths

Instructions

  • Preheat oven to 275°F.
  • Mix the flour with a generous amount of salt and pepper on a sheet of waxed paper. Pat the roast dry; dredge it in the flour mixture on all sides.
  • Heat butter and olive oil in a large Dutch oven over medium-high heat until it is hot but not smoking. Brown the meat to give it nice color (about 5 minutes per side). Transfer the meat to a plate.
    Browning chuck roast in a dutch oven
  • Reduce the heat to medium and add 1 cup of the beef broth, scraping with a wooden spoon to deglaze the pan (loosening all of the browned bits from the bottom).
    Deglazing pot with beef broth
  • Add the onions, carrots, celery and garlic to the pot. Cook, stirring, until the onions are translucent (about 10 minutes). Place the roast on top of the vegetables.
    Adding vegetables to a Dutch oven
  • Add the remaining two cups of beef broth, red wine, thyme, rosemary and bay leaves. Season with salt and pepper, cover, and bake in the 275° F oven for 2 hours.
    Adding herbs to a Dutch oven
  • After 2 hours, add the potatoes to the pot, mixing them into the liquid.
    Peeling russet potatoes
  • Cover and return to the oven for another 45 minutes – 1 hour, or until the potatoes are soft and the meat is fall-apart tender.
    Close up side shot of a dutch oven pot roast in a blue pot

Video

Notes

  • Use a heavy cast iron Dutch oven (I like this great investment piece by Le Creuset) or another heavy oven-safe pot with a tight-fitting lid. Simply covering a dish with aluminum foil is not ideal.
  • Sear the meat and get some really nice color on it before you begin the slow braising process. The caramelized surface of the meat will give the dish rich flavor and the browning process will help to lock in the juices. Dredging the meat in the flour before browning adds body to the finished sauce.
  • Why is my pot roast tough? Undercooked pot roast will be tough and chewy. If you’re using tougher or bigger cuts of beef (other than a chuck roast), you may need to increase the cooking time to give the meat fibers plenty of time to break down and become tender and juicy.
  • Why is my pot roast dry? Cooking the meat for too long can result in a dry pot roast. This often happens when you use appliances like the Crock Pot or Instant Pot. Another reason the Dutch oven method is so great!
  • Omit the potatoes in your pot, and instead serve the finished dish over a plate of mashed potatoes instead.
  • Most grocery stores sell boneless chuck roasts that weigh about 3 pounds. Those are perfect for this recipe! I have also used a 4-lb. bone-in chuck roast from a local farm, which requires about the same cooking time as a 3-lb. boneless roast. The bone adds a lot of rich flavor to the juices in the pot, but the bone-in chuck roasts are harder to find in stores. If you use larger boneless roasts (such as 4-5 lbs.), you’ll need to increase the cooking time by about 1 hour.
  • I love the added depth of flavor that you get from the red wine; however, you can substitute with additional beef broth in lieu of the red wine.
  • Make a gravy using the drippings from the pot. To do so, melt 2 tablespoons of butter in a skillet over medium heat. Whisk in 2 tablespoons of flour and cook for 30 seconds, stirring constantly. While continually whisking, gradually add 1 – 1 ½ cups of strained juices/drippings from the pot until the gravy reaches the desired consistency. Continue whisking while the gravy bubbles and cooks for 1-2 minutes. Season with additional salt and pepper, to taste.

Nutrition

Serving: 1/8 of the recipeCalories: 385kcalCarbohydrates: 20.2gProtein: 39.5gFat: 15.6gSaturated Fat: 7.4gPolyunsaturated Fat: 0.5gMonounsaturated Fat: 2.9gCholesterol: 168.9mgSodium: 325.3mgPotassium: 1111.9mgFiber: 2.8gSugar: 3.7g
Keyword: chuck roast recipe, Dutch oven Pot Roast, Juicy Pot Roast, Oven Baked Chuck Roast Recipe
Course: Dinner
Cuisine: American
Author: Blair Lonergan

Disclosure: This post may contain affiliate links. I may earn a small commission for my endorsement, recommendation, testimonial, and/or link to any products or services from this website. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

This recipe was originally published in August, 2020. The photos were updated in August, 2022.

blair

Hey, I’m Blair!

Welcome to my farmhouse kitchen in the foothills of Virginia’s Blue Ridge Mountains. Inspired by local traditions and seasonal fare, you’ll find plenty of easy, comforting recipes that bring your family together around the table. It’s down-home, country-style cooking!

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Comments

  1. 5 stars
    Made this last night for dinner and it was amazing! Prepared exactly as per your instructions, but also uncovered for an additional 15 minutes to let things brown up a bit at the end. Also I made a gravy out of the drippings because there’d be a mutiny in this house if no gravy! This smells so good cooking! Husband really raved. Don’t know what made me want to do a pot roast in August, but I had a craving and am glad I did! Great dish!

    1. Thank you, Norma! I’m so happy to hear that! I totally understand the craving for pot roast — even in August. 🙂 I’ve been making comfort food dishes for the past couple of weeks now, too. After a summer of grilled foods and salads, it tastes so good. Have a great week!

      1. 5 stars
        This is the 3rd time we have made this dish and we absolutely love it!! I did add a small can of petite tomatoes per my husband’s request. This recipe never disappoints and is amazing! Thank you ❤️

      1. Hi, Linda! I’m not sure how Norma makes her gravy, but one easy method is to melt about 1/4 cup of butter in a saucepan over low heat. Add about 1/4 cup of flour and cook, stirring, for 1 minute. Gradually, while whisking, stir in 2 cups of pan drippings from the pot roast until smooth. Simmer and cook, stirring, until it thickens. Season with salt, pepper and other seasonings, to taste. If you don’t have 2 cups of drippings, you can add beef broth to equal that amount. Enjoy!

    2. I make this for keto but no potato’s or carrots. It’s an amazing low carb dish! Off keto I add all the veggies and make cornbread with it! So good. I like to add mushrooms on or off keto as well.

          1. You will likely need to cook a little bit longer but likely not the entire time. Keep an eye on your meat, and remove it from the heat as soon as it is fall-apart tender. Hope this helps!

      1. 5 stars
        This is my go to recipe for Yankee Roast.
        I have made it many times in the oven, and once while camping on a fire with coals to finish.
        Always delicious! and rather elegant at the campsite. Bravo!

        1. Thank you, Chris! I’m so happy to hear that! Glad to know that it works well at the campsite, too. 🙂

  2. 5 stars
    I am almost 60 and I’ve been cooking pot roast for a long time. This is by far the best. My family has gone on and on about how good and tender the roast was. Followed exactly. Yummy!

        1. Hi, Lauran! I used a 7-quart Dutch oven, but the recipe should work any Dutch oven that’s about 5 quarts or larger. Hope you enjoy!

    1. Hey, Rachel! All of the measurements are included in the recipe card at the end of the post. It’s 3 cups of beef broth and 1/2 cup red wine. Hope that helps!

  3. Making this for dinner on Friday and I’m so so excited! I’m usually a crock pot kind of gal but I have to give this a shot.

  4. 5 stars
    Made this tonight. I used a 3 lb. 2 inch slab of bottom round with a nice cap of fat on the top. Other than subbing round for chuck, I followed the recipe closely.. EXCEPT OOPS! I cooked it at 350 for the first hour. When I realized my mistake, I lowered the oven to the 275. Yes, I used my very old (40 years) Le Creuset dutch oven. I also used more Cabernet Sauvignon when the liquid level got too low. Served it with a mushroom risotto.. Delicious…very tender.and juicy. It sliced into nice even, not falling apart or “shreddy”pieces. Made a simple gravy of the juices and puréed very soft veggies into the gravy. I left the Yukon Golds in small chunks.

    Thanks for the recipe. I will be using this again.

      1. Mine is in oven now! I sauteed potatoes just a little in drippings… will add per recipe. Also added 1 Tbsp tomato paste.

  5. 5 stars
    I made this tonight and my husband said afterwards that it was hands down the best pot roast he’s ever eaten. I was really pleased at how it turned out – so tender with unbelievable flavor. Thank you for sharing. I will make this again! Highly recommend!!!

  6. 5 stars
    I am going to make a 4 lb roast, should I braise for 3 hours before adding the potatoes? I am afraid to dry out the meat, should I add any additional liquid? thank you!

    1. Hi, Michelle! I actually just made this dish with a roast that was close to 4 lbs. earlier this week. You shouldn’t need any extra liquid. I cooked mine for a total of about 3 1/2 hours, and it was perfect. I would suggest the same for you. If your roast isn’t fall-apart tender after 3 1/2 hours, you can always take the potatoes out (cover with foil to keep warm) and continue roasting until the meat is finished. But I think that should be enough time for a perfect 4-lb. pot roast! Enjoy. 🙂

  7. I made this tonight minus the celery as I didn’t have any. It was wonderful, my husband loved it and my picky eater, 14 year old Shi Tzu, Abbie asked for 3rds (which I had to refuse). I did add some Wondra flour to make gravy. It was so good. Thank you for the recipe.

  8. Although perhaps unconventional, I added a pinch of dried tarragon to the roast when I added the potatoes. Tarragon gives the dish a very subtle, fresh taste and provides just as subtle an aroma.

  9. 5 stars
    This has become a firehouse fav for Sunday dinners. I usually make pot roast in the crock pot and let the smells permeate the house for the day. With the rosemary and thyme in the recipe the house smells even better. This is way better than the crock pot. Also i like this recipe because it is moderately simple to make. Good recipe.

  10. 5 stars
    Made this last night for dinner and it was very good, the house did smell very homey. I am going to add a bit of Worcestershire sauce the next time I make it ( I usually use it when I make beef)and there will be a next time. I did thicken the gravy a bit before serving. I also made no-knead bread and that was awesome. If we don’t get out of covid lock down soon I am going to be 200 lbs.

    1. 5 stars
      For years I’ve been making Pot Roast and failing miserably, never tender, usually using a crock pot. I tried your Dutch Oven recipe last night and my family loved it! I’ve finally found the best recipe ever, thank you! I followed your recipe exact, used a French Bordeaux wine, fresh herbs ~ perfection!

      1. Wonderful, Nancy! I’m so glad to know that you enjoyed it and that it was finally a success. Thanks for letting me know! 🙂

    1. Hi, Jen! You shouldn’t need to add much more liquid. I would start with the specified amount, but keep an eye on it and add more broth or red wine as it’s cooking if you think it looks like it’s getting low. You have some flexibility with the rest of the ingredients. If you’re serving a larger crowd and you’d like more potatoes at the end, feel free to double those. If you want to throw in an extra onion, an extra carrot or two, etc. that will be fine — but it’s not necessary. Just make sure that you have enough room in your Dutch oven for all of those extra ingredients. 🙂 Enjoy!

  11. 5 stars
    I’m making this now. It’s the 2nd time. So delicious. Absolutely the best recipe for pot roast. Hubby bought some pre made garlic mashed potatoes (so not not good) but we are having them and I will be making gravy. Love, love, love this recipe!!

    1. That’s amazing, Susan! Sounds like the perfect meal on a chilly day. 🙂

      Thanks for taking the time to leave a note!

  12. 2 stars
    I was excited to test out this recipe in my new Dutch oven!! Maybe it’s my Louisiana born and raised taste buds, but I found this incredibly boring and tasteless. I made gravy from the drippings and it only helped slightly. When reheating leftovers, I added Tony’s Chachere’s seasoning, more onions, celery, a red bell pepper, and Worcestershire sauce. It made a heck of a difference and added great flavor!!

    1. Given what you added on reheat, you may not have seasoned enough up front. I always do a light salt on the onions just after chopping (this makes a big difference), and you can add more salt and flavorings when you brown the meat including a pinch of cayenne if you are so inclined. You should know your own seasoning preferences by now, but don’t expect general consumer recipes to go overboard on salt or spice because most people won’t like that.

  13. I made this with the chuck roast and wow!! It was absolutely amazing!!! Has anyone tried this recipe with a round roast? If so how long was the cooking time? Thanks in advance 🙂

    1. Thanks, Breanne! So glad that you enjoyed it! I haven’t tried it myself with the round roast, so I can’t offer a tested cooking time. As long as it’s about the same size, I would stick with the same general cooking time/temp.

  14. 5 stars
    I made this with the chuck roast and wow!! It was absolutely amazing!!! Has anyone tried this recipe with a round roast? If so how long was the cooking time? Thanks in advance

  15. 5 stars
    I made this pot roast and it was the best I have ever eaten. I followed the directions exactly except I used one cup wine rather the the recommended amount. It was so good I have since shared the recipe with a number of friends. Can hardly wait to make this again!

  16. 5 stars
    Absolutely delicious! Once cooked, I took the roast out of the DO then added 3T corn starch with 3T cold water to make a Gravy out of the Broth leaving the veggies in. Hubby said its a must make again recipe

  17. 5 stars
    I made this today, on a perfect, chilly January day, and it was delicious! Thank you!! Our kitty had some leftovers and thoroughly enjoyed it too lol!! Highly recommend!

    1. Hi, Trish! Yes! I’ve never actually cooked a pot roast that small (I’ve got 4 hungry boys to feed), so I don’t know exactly how long it will take. I would add the potatoes after the first hour, because it might only need a total of about 2 hours. Check it at that point, see if it’s fall-apart tender. If it’s still tough, then you’ll know that it needs longer in the oven. Enjoy!

        1. This was delicious! My small roast was fork tender in 2.5 hours and we ate the whole thing!!! A perfect meal for two. Thanks’nnnn

          1. Awesome! Thanks, Trish. I appreciate you coming back here to let me know. I’m sure it will help someone else in the future, too. 🙂

  18. 5 stars
    This was just my second time to use my Dutch oven and it turned out great! I didn’t have celery, used petite carrots and only one onion. Thank you!

    1. Awesome! I’m so glad that it worked well for you, Autumn! Thanks for taking the time to come back here and leave me a note. 🙂

      1. I have a question and I couldn’t find a comment button so I thought I’d just reply.. but are the veggies supposed to take up lots of room in the Dutch at the beginning?? I’m doing a 3.19 lb roast and followed the instructions and actually used 1.5 of the onion and it just seems really full already! I hope the potato will fit!

        1. Hi, Evelyn! Yes, I think that’s normal. They will cook down quite a bit, and you can nestle the potato around the meat as it shrinks and cooks, too. Hope you enjoy it!

  19. 5 stars
    I made this recipe tonight. It was absolutely delicious! Everybody loved the meal! I will definitely make this again! Thank you so much for sharing your wonderful recipe!

        1. I would say that you could probably reduce the total cooking time by about 30 minutes, but honestly…even a 2-lb. roast would probably be fine for this length of time. The meat just breaks down and gets really nice and tender as it slowly cooks. If you want to reduce the overall cooking time to account for the smaller roast, I would add the potatoes after 90 minutes instead of 2 hours. Then continue cooking for another 45 minutes – 1 hour, until the potatoes are tender and the roast is done. Enjoy!

  20. 5 stars
    Today I followed this recipe pretty much to the letter and was extremely impressed. The meat was fall-apart tender and very flavorful, the veggies likewise. The sauce was rich and delicious, if a little thin. To remedy this, I removed about a cup of the pan juices and made a gravy, which I then stirred back into the main pot. Not the most efficient method, but I’ll tinker with it, because I will definitely be making this again! Even my somewhat meat-averse husband declared the recipe a keeper.

    1. If I make a 6 lb roast, should I double the amount of olive oil. Butter, vegetables, etc? Thank you. Excited to try this recipe!

      1. Hi, J! That’s kind of up to you. If you are serving a larger group and want to have more veggies to serve on the side, I would double all of those ingredients (so long as you have room in your pot!). You want to have enough butter and oil to comfortably coat the bottom of your pot. If the listed amount is adequate to coat the bottom of your large pot, then you shouldn’t need to increase those amounts. Same with the flour — use enough to give the meat a light coating, adding more if necessary.

        You might want to increase the amount of broth and red wine, as well as the herbs by a bit. Depending on how the roast sits in your pot, you’ll want enough liquid so that the meat braises properly (the liquid should come to about halfway up the side of the roast).

        Hope that helps, and enjoy!

        1. Hi, Sammie! Yes, although I personally don’t think the pot roasts ever turn out quite as well in the slow cooker. 🙂 If you’re using the Crock Pot, you’ll typically need about 8-10 hours on LOW for the meat to be fall-apart tender. Hope you enjoy!

    1. Yes — any dry red wine will work! Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot or Pinot Noir are all good options. Just make sure it’s something that you’d like to drink. 🙂

  21. 5 stars
    One of the most important steps to me is that you use all the flour with salt and pepper. If it doesn’t stick, just pour it on top of the roast when browning. All of the flour makes a difference in how the drippings/gravy turn out in the end.

    1. A dry red wine (nothing sweet) such as Pinot Noir is great. You can also use Cabernet Sauvignon, Malbec, Shiraz or Merlot. Most importantly, pick a high-quality wine that you would actually like to drink, since the wine that you cook with will impact the taste of your meal.

  22. Absolutely perfect. I had a 5 lb Chuck roast and I followed directions and roasted slowly for 5 hours. It melted in your mouth. So delicious! Than you.

  23. I have a 3lb roast and one just over2 lbs. I would like to cook them together. Do I need to change anything? If I have to do the vege’s separate that is fine with me.

    1. Hi, Susan! If you have a big enough Dutch oven to accommodate both at the same time, I don’t think you should need to change anything. Hope you enjoy!

  24. 5 stars
    My pot roast is in the oven right now. This is my favorite Dutch Oven roast recipe. Delicious every time!! If I’ve made French dip sandwiches with left overs which we Love..Thank You for your recipe!!

      1. Hi there! I am making a roast this week and have a question. Does the addition of flour make the leftover juices into a gravy that could be served over mashed potatoes? This could be a game-changer. I can’t make gravy to save my life so I buy store-bought (gasp, horror ; ) when I need gravy.

        1. Hi, Heather! There’s not enough flour in the recipe to thicken the gravy to a traditional consistency on its own, but you can use the drippings in the pot to make a gravy separately. Here’s a “recipe”:

          Optional gravy:
          2 tablespoons butter
          2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
          1 – 1 ½ cups of juices/drippings from the pot

          Strain the juices and drippings from the pot. Melt the butter in a skillet over medium heat until bubbly. Whisk in the flour and cook for 30 seconds. While continually whisking, gradually add the juices until the gravy reaches the desired consistency.
          Continue whisking while the gravy bubbles and cooks for 1-2 minutes. Season with additional salt and pepper, to taste.

  25. 5 stars
    This was my first time making a pot roast in a dutch oven. Followed your directions exactly, and it came out so tender! Absolutely delicious – the house smelled heavenly while it was cooking. Thanks for the recipe!

    1. I’m so glad to hear that, Mary Ann! Thanks for taking the time to come back here and let me know. 🙂

        1. Hi, Lisa! If the meat was tough, it probably wasn’t cooked long enough. The meat should be fall-apart tender when it’s done. These tough cuts of meat need to cook long enough for the tough fibers to break down so that it becomes tender and juicy.

    1. Yes, you can. I think the red wine pairs better with the hearty beef, but white wine will work…it will just have a different flavor. 🙂

  26. Do I need to raise the level of the liquids in the Dutch Oven to at least half way to the thickness of the Roast?

    1. Hi, Rick! I know that some folks say to do that (and I think it’s totally fine if you like), but I haven’t found that it’s necessary. I tend to just keep an eye on the pot and so long as it seems to have plenty of liquid in there to keep everything moist, it turns out great. Feel free to add more broth or wine, though, if you think it might need it. It won’t hurt. 🙂

    1. Yes, you can! I like the flavor that you get from the butter, but just using oil is fine as well. 🙂

  27. 5 stars
    Hi, Blair!

    I’ve used a lot of online recipes, but never felt a need to comment on anyone’s before. This really was perfect. I’m not a roast veteran but this was definitely the best I’ve made so far.

    Your directions, temps, times, etc were on point. Only deviations from your recipe I made were using a rump roast, subbing turnips for potatoes, and adding about a half cup of apple cider to the liquid mix. One of the only recipes I’ve made where so much flavor makes us for very little salt. Thanks!

  28. I have discovered mushroom soy sauce and it is amazing with beef, esp. pot roast. I prefer it over using wine. You must be careful with it though as it is strong stuff.

  29. 5 stars
    I made this over the weekend it was so good. We aren’t wine drinkers but we love craft beer so I used a good quality imperial stout with notes of cocoa.

    1. Hi, Ashley! Either will work. I typically use a sweet onion, like Vidalia, but you can use any onion that you prefer. Hope you enjoy!

  30. Hi.. Make this pot roast for tomorrow. Can port wine be used? I’m not a wine person so I’m not sure if that is considered a sweet wine. Thank you, Maria

  31. 4 stars
    Love this recipe. After adding the potatoes (brilliant!), I needed to cook it an additional 1.5 hours for it to fall apart. That delayed dinner, but it was worth the wait.

  32. 5 stars
    This was so delicious! I made it without the potato. We had a baked potato on the side. The only thing I would do different is put the fresh rosemary and thyme in a tied up cheesecloth so I won’t have to pick it out afterward. So good!

  33. Hi, just made the recipe (it’s in the oven) and found there were way too many veggies for the amount of broth to cook them, so I put all the broth in and it was fine. Because some of it evaporated I just added more when I put it in the oven. I watched the video and it didn’t look like there were 2 onions, 5 carrots and 4 celery. Or were they really small? It smells delicious! Thanks.

    1. Hi, Judi! Everything in the recipe should have been on the video, but no worries — I’m glad that you made it work for your kitchen! I hope you enjoy the meal when it comes out of your oven. 🙂

    2. 3 stars
      This recipe was a miss for me. I punched up the garlic and spices. Cooked a 3.lb bone in roast from my quality butcher for 3hrs in my Staub Dutch oven and still wasn’t fall apart cooked. Once I finally fot there I found the remaining liquid and vegetables quite bland. Will need to find other flavors to add to give this something to return to.

      1. 3 stars
        I was so hopeful for this recipe! I followed it exactly & seasoned with enough salt & pepper but found it lacking flavor. I even doubled the garlic. The roast ( good quality!) was not fall apart tender for me either- I gave it at least 3 hours too 🙁

  34. 5 stars
    Just made this today and it was phenomenal. I’ve made pot roasts before but always used a slow cooker, and they always came out dry, even though I used the Low setting. Anyway, the lower temperature your recipe calls for intrigued me, and it seems to have done the trick. It took just about three hours at 375, but the end result was very flavorful and moist. Definitely making again. Thank you!

  35. 5 stars
    This turned delicious, although I did my own twist on it. I wanted to use the dried herbs I already had in my pantry. I also added corn on the cob to the recipe for my family.

    1. Hello! If making mashed potatoes on the side, do you still recommend the full 45 minutes of added cook time after the initial 2 hour time period? Looking forward to making this tonight! Thanks in advance.

  36. 5 stars
    Thanks for this incredibly delicious recipe. I’m an Aussie with an American husband, and hadn’t made pot roast before! My husband loved it. I adapted it to the instant pot as I was short on time and I will be keeping this recipe! Truly one of my new favorites.

  37. 5 stars
    This recipe was delicious. I have made pot roast a variety of ways, but this recipe had a lot of flavor and my family really enjoyed it!!! This will be on my winter rotation for sure!!!
    Thank you!!

  38. 1 star
    I followed the recipe exactly but it was a disappointment sadly. It was not tender at all. If I cooked it longer my veggies would have been mushy and I wasn’t about to scoop them out. This was a waste. In the past I cooked these for eight hours in my slow cooker and they were much more tender.

    1. I agree. I did just as instructed and the meat is tough and I have to cook it longer to make it eatable, not tough. I’m not a weak person but when trying to separate the meat with two forks, I almost slung the roast across the room while pulling. I would skip this recipe in the Dutch oven and use a crock pot!!!!!

  39. Hi Blair and Happy New Year to all! Thanks for replying to posts almost 18 months after publishing this recipe.
    Question for you: What quart size Dutch Oven did you use? I’m seeing some good sales on high-quality 4 quarts, but wonder whether this size will be too limiting for most Dutch oven recipes. I’m an older, single cook and happy to have leftovers to freeze. Thank you!

    1. Hi, Caroline! I prefer a bigger Dutch oven for most recipes (especially soups, stews, chilis, and roasts). You can get away with a smaller Dutch oven for loaves of bread or if you cut recipes in half, but I much prefer the flexibility of the bigger pot. This is a 7 1/4-quart, and it’s the size that I use most often. I do have a 5 1/2 quart Dutch oven that I use a lot as well, but I rarely go smaller than that. Hope that helps!

  40. 4 stars
    I just made this on my maiden voyage with a Dutch oven. The only thing I altered was adding Worchestershire sauce after I was done for more flavor in the gravy. I added it to taste, probably about 2 tbsp. I’d add it with the wine next time for more depth of flavor. Very good. Thanks for helping me discover the Dutch oven!

    1. Hi, Jenn! I’m sorry that you didn’t think it had enough flavor. I would try adding more garlic, more herbs, some extra red wine, and/or additional salt and pepper, if necessary. If you like your food spicy, you can try adding some crushed red pepper flakes, too.

  41. I have an All Clad stainless steel Dutch oven. I can’t handle the weight of the cast iron Dutch ovens and also had a LeCreuset baking dish in the past and the enamel chipped, so I’m not a fan.
    I Is it okay to use stainless Dutch oven?

    1. Hi, Rosemarie! I think so! I’ve never tried a pot roast in the All Clad, so I can’t say how it might differ, but I think it should work fine. Hope you enjoy the recipe!

    1. Hi, Roni! Yes, you definitely can. I find that sweet potatoes tend to get mushy faster than russets, so you might add them a little bit later. Totally up to you, though. Hope you enjoy!

  42. As with others who commented, I seemed to have excessively more carrots and onions in my Dutch oven than what appears in your video. They were large carrots and onions so perhaps that was the difference. It’s all in the oven now and hoping for the best!

  43. 1 star
    This recipe was a big disappointment for me: though the flavor was nice (especially because of the fresh thyme and rosemary sprigs), the meat turned out very tough, so that it was a real unpleasant chore to chew it. I don’t know how the recipe could claim in the opening sentence that the meat would be tender, or how anyone could arrive at that result when following the recipe exactly. I had a 3-pound chuck roast, and followed the instructions very closely, using my 7-quart Staub Dutch oven. I cooked it in a 275-degree oven for 2 hours (after all the browning), added the potatoes, and cooked for another 1 hour (not just 45 minutes). The meat was hard to cut and very tough, so I cooked the dish for yet another 35 minutes, still at 275 degrees as called for; and the meat was still tough though it had now cooked a total of 3 hours and 35 minutes in the oven. I think the problem must be that the temperature of 275 degrees is just too low. My oven (a Miele) actually measures about 6 degrees hot! Previous times when I’ve cooked pot roast with other recipes, I’ve cooked it at 325 degrees for about 3-1/2 hours altogether. But since this was the first time I’d made this recipe, I wanted to follow it closely, foolishly trusting it. Very disappointed.

  44. 5 stars
    Leave it alone. Don’t change anything! Made it and it was fantastic. All family love it! Me Too!!!!!

    Larry Hamlin

  45. 4 stars
    Loved this first time around; did add a bit more in the herb and wine, and next time I would also use more broth. But I’m wondering your suggestions for cooking a smaller roast? I have one that’s 2.25lbs and don’t want to overcook…

    1. Hi, Felicia! The smaller roast will require slightly less cooking time, but I can’t say exactly how much without testing it myself. I’d guess about 15-20 minutes less? Not much less, because you still need a good amount of time to break down the tough fibers and collagen in the meat. The good news is that if you cook it a little “too long,” it will still be tender and juicy with this type of cut. It’s not like a steak that you need to be more exact. You definitely don’t want to undercook it though, or the meat will be tough. Hope that helps!

  46. okay. I think maybe I was taking too precise of an approach…2.25 is 75% of 3, so I should reduce the initial cook time by 25% and start with 90minutes before I add the potatoes…I didn’t want the meat to get overcooked and tough for that reason, either…

  47. 5 stars
    Delicious. I did it with a boneless blade roast. Cook time just right, gravy delicious, meat very tender and fall apart. Love to have found an easy recipe that cooks this type of cut so well.

  48. 3 stars
    It wasn’t bad but it was so bland. I even added lots more garlic and had fresh herbs and even with more salt it just had no flavor. Not a bad recipe by any means and I love all the veggies but I prefer using the instant pot method for a more tender roast. The meat always comes out perfect using the instant pot.

  49. 5 stars
    Hello! This is my first time using my Dutch oven. If making mashed potatoes on the side, do you still recommend the full 45 minutes of added cook time after the initial 2 hour time period? Looking forward to making this tonight! Thanks in advance.

    1. Hi, Les! Even if you’re not planning to cook potatoes in the pot, you will still need to cook the meat for that full length of time. That will ensure that it’s tender and juicy by the end. And undercooked pot roast will be tough, which is obviously not what you want.

      Hope you enjoy the meal!

    2. 5 stars
      Great meal. I made two at the same time, one for my family. One for our neighbors. Turned out great. Good flavor. Could absolutely make gravy with the liquid in the pot if you wanted. Will make again.

  50. 5 stars
    I made this yesterday for dinner and it was a great hit!!! I only cook once per week and last night was for my wife, daughter and granddaughter so the pressure was on. Easy to follow and do.

    1. 5 stars
      Hi Blair! I’m making this recipe tomorrow for another family who are grieving a loss. I’m a vegetarian so can’t taste for seasoning and not used to cooking meat often. Could you advise on how much salt and pepper to put on the meat, and also how much to add at the end before putting in the oven? I’m using regular beef broth so don’t want to overdo it, but I want to make sure it’s seasoned correctly. Thanks for any help ❤️

      1. Hi Cassandra,
        It’s so kind of you to prepare this. Of course, everyone has different preferences. However, we would recommend starting with roughly 1 1/2 tsps of salt and 1 tsp of pepper. It’s always easy to add an extra dash when eating, too.

  51. 5 stars
    I used this recipe to christen my new cast iron dutch oven. Great recipe, everyone loved it.

    I did make one small change. I used an oatmeal stout instead of red wine.

    1. 5 stars
      BTW, I used your gravy recipe as well. Delicious! My first time making gravy that didn’t come from a foil envelope.

        1. Hi, Todd! Yes, I’ve actually done so recently and will publish a post about it soon. 🙂 I find that it works well to simmer the pot over medium-low heat (covered) for about 3 hours. Hope you enjoy!

  52. 5 stars
    This pot roast was a huge hit with my family. It was the first meal I ever made in my Dutch oven and was a fabulous way to christen my new “toy.” It was a surprisingly simple recipe to make and tasted absolutely delicious (not to mention my house smelled amazing all afternoon while the roast was cooking). I did use a chuck roast and it cooked up perfectly. I added in mushrooms with the other veggies because my family loves them, and I served the roast with a rustic loaf of bread. I love recipes in which everything is done in one pot or pan, so between the ease and the deliciousness, this pot roast is definitely going into my family’s regular rotation.

    1. 5 stars
      I made Blair’s wonderful fabulous recipe, doubled almost all of the ingredients, and cooked in all in my 13 Quart Le Creuset anodized Dutch Oven pot. It was the most succulent beautifully cooked piece of boneless chuck roast I had ever had. In addition, the vegetables were perfectly cooked and amazingly delicious. The only item I added to the finished meal to make it complete was a large loaf of freshly baked Italian twist bread, and a glass of dry burgundy wine to was it down. Thank you dear Blair, for providing both me and my family with a recipe I believe we will use for generations to come, in what was one of the greatest meals it was my privilege to create..

  53. Looking forward to making this recipe as part of our Thanksgiving dinner. Will dry rub the meat a few days prior, brown the carrots and onion in the brown bits, and use a Malbec to deglaze. I am so looking forward to making 🙂

  54. Hi Blair!

    I have tried this recipe a number of times and have had to cook it longer. I am using a gas oven for the first time and have no idea if that is the problem as I have never cooked with gas before. Are you cooking with a thinner cut of meat? About how thick is your roast. The flavor is absolutely wonderful once it is finished. ( 7 hours later ) Figured it would take that long, after having cooked a few before, so was ready for the length of time. Help! I want this roast to work in a shorter amount of time. Checked oven temperature and it was correct. I am using a very expensive pot.

    1. Hi, Nancy Leigh! I honestly don’t know why the roast would take so long. I’m assuming that you’re using a 3 lb. roast — nothing larger? I don’t know exactly how thick the piece of meat is, but I would estimate from memory about 1.5 inches or so? I’ve made this so many times and I’ve never had it take longer than 3 hours. I also cook with a gas range and use a nice Dutch oven, so I don’t think either of those variables should make a big difference in your case.

      I’m sorry that I can’t offer a more definitive solution. The only other option would be to increase the temperature of your oven to help it cook faster. You can roast the meat at 350 if you like…just keep an eye on the temp of your roast as it cooks. As long as it’s in there for a few hours, it should still be tender and juicy by the time it’s done. 🙂

      1. 5 stars
        Love it! I need to super-sized this recipe for a big family gathering. I have an 11.5 pound roast and need to know how long to cook it for??

        1. Oh, wow! I’ve never cooked a roast that large with this recipe. Do you have a Dutch oven that can accommodate a piece of meat that large? I would guess you’ll need at least 6-8 hours, but again…I haven’t actually tested this so it’s just a guess. I would give it plenty of time, check it regularly, and if it happens to be done sooner than you expect, no problem. You can always reheat it just before serving.

  55. 5 stars
    I had to borrow a Dutch oven from my husband’s aunt to make this dish and it turned out wonderfully! And I’ve never used a Dutch oven before. For me, this recipe was involved because I had to cut veggies (real non- cooker here) but I would def make this again. It turned out so well, that I’d even make it for family gatherings to impress everyone with my ability to follow a recipe, lol. Thanks for this.

  56. 5 stars
    Made this yesterday. It turned out awesome. The meat was tender and the flavor was amazing. Definitely will be making this again.

    1. Hi, Sam! That will work fine! Here are the make-ahead instructions:

      If you prepare the roast a day ahead, cover and refrigerate it overnight. You can just leave it in the same Dutch oven, but let it cool to room temperature before placing it in the fridge. The next day, skim off any solidified fat and reheat it gently in a warm oven or over low heat on the stovetop.

  57. 5 stars
    I usually find these blog recipes somewhat disappointing. This turned out absolutely incredible. Will be making this often.

    I did the potatoes separately (mashed) and used apple cider because I didn’t have any red wine around.

  58. 5 stars
    It’s been years since I’ve done a pot roast and I decided to use this recipe for Christmas dinner – it turned out great! The roast was about 4 1/2 pounds for 8 people and there was enough left over for MAYBE one lunch today. Everyone raved about the roast (none of us are big red meat eaters so that’s a great compliment!) One question – after taking everything out of the pot there was SO much liquid left – I know the lid was on the whole time, but doesn’t some of that liquid cook away?
    Thanks for a great recipe!

    1. Hi, Cynthia! That’s good — you want plenty of liquid in the pot, since you need it to braise the meat. The vegetables and meat release a lot of liquid as they cook, and since the lid is on the pot nothing evaporates. You can use some of the drippings and liquid from the pot to make a gravy, if you like!

  59. 5 stars
    This is the best roast recipe I’ve ever made. I cook it a little longer than called for, but the recipe is perfect. ♥️

  60. Good morning. How do I make beef broth to add to the recipe please? I plan on making pot roast with your recipe today and prefer not to use store bought broth. Many thanks.

  61. 5 stars
    This is the best recipe for pot roast. I’ve made it over 6 times so far. It’s excellent. Thank you for sharing it ❤️

  62. 5 stars
    Hi Blair! Because I’ve read a number of recipes for Pot Roast in a Dutch oven, I loved the image and imagined aroma your recipe produced just from reading it! Question, my hubby and I are empty nesters and would only have a 2 pound Chuck Roast for dinner and leftovers (if they’re available). So, how long would our roast take given for this reduced size of roast? There would still be plenty of yummy (red) potatoes, carrots, celery, onions, etc., plus red wine, beef broth and seasonings added in to dazzle our tongues! Many thanks!

    1. Hi Shari,
      We haven’t tested this recipe with a 2-pound roast and can’t attest to the results. We recommend using a 3-pound roast and storing the leftovers for another day to ensure your roast has enough time to become tender and juicy! A smaller cut is likely to overcook and dry out before the rest of the ingredients are ready.

  63. This might be a very good recipe, however there are so many ads on this page that cover most of the recipe up that I have given up.

    1. We’re sorry you feel this way, Sue. We do try to keep ads to a minimum, but they are how we are able to continue to put out recipes for free. You can also click the “jump to recipe” button at the top of any page to skip down to the recipe card and skip the bulk of the ads. We do hope you give the recipe a try!

  64. Hi. I need to cook this totally on the stove top, as I don’t have a working oven large enough for my cast iron dutch oven. Should I just follow the instructions and leave it on the stovetop? Or do I need to do something different.
    Thank you

  65. 5 stars
    I just bought a new Dutch oven a week ago and was looking for a first recipe to make in it. I found your Juicy Pot Roast recipe and, based on the rave reviews, decided to buy the ingredients I needed to make it. I followed the instructions exactly and my husband and I were pleasantly surprised at how very tasty and tender the Chuck roast was. I did use dried herbs and may opt for fresh the next time. Thank you for this delicious recipe! I will be making it again next month, no doubt.

  66. 5 stars
    TWO onions though? Even after watching your video it looks like half an onion at the very most.

    I made this for my daughter and I and it was pretty fantabulous! Thanks for the amazing recipe!

        1. Hi, Hannah! You might be able to reduce the total cooking time slightly, but you’ll just need to keep an eye on it. You’ll know the meat is done when it’s fall-apart tender. Hope you enjoy!

  67. I don’t know what kind of special cows you have, but the sirloin and short loin are at the back half of the cow, not the front. The chuck roast is near the front.

  68. 5 stars
    This is a fantastic recipe! The technique is easy to follow and almost fool proof. The flavors are amazing and the left over makes great sandwiches on french bread. I’ve made this recipe twice, one exactly as instructed and the other with slight modifications. The first was exactly like the recipe, as to pay respect to the author I try not to modify too much, had excellent results. The second time I used leeks instead of onions, it’s a milder onion flavor and in season at my local farm. I also tossed the chopped vegetables with 3 tbls of flour to have a thicker sauce. Both turned out amazing and just solidified what a complete recipe this is. I will be excited about trying other recipes from this author. Thanks!

    1. Thank you so much for such great feedback, William! We truly appreciate it and are so glad you enjoyed the recipe.

  69. I followed the directions to a T. Used a cast iron Dutch oven. The meat was tough. It was a boneless chuck roast from Costco. Choice cut. It was tough as nails.

  70. 5 stars
    Man this was great! I don’t know why I’ve never made a roast in my DO before but it’s the way to go. I followed the recipe but didn’t have wine, fresh herbs (used dried), nor potatoes so cooked rice on the side. I used a bunch of whole cloves garlic. Also made gravy which was delicious with the drippings. My husband usually doesn’t care for chuck roast but he loved this! So juicy, tender, and flavorful! Next time I’ll make sure to have the exact ingredients just to try it your way, but honestly you can’t go wrong tweaking a bit. Thank you!

    1. Thank you for such a kind review, Stacy! We’re so happy to hear you were able to adjust the recipe to fit your needs and that it was such a hit!