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Similar to a beef ragù, this braised beef with red wine and tomatoes is classic comfort food! The chuck roast slowly cooks in a Dutch oven with onions, tomatoes, herbs, and red wine until it’s juicy and fall-apart tender. The rich, flavorful sauce tastes like the perfect cross between a pot roast, a beef stew, and a spaghetti meat sauce. Serve it with mashed potatoes, noodles, or a loaf of crusty bread for a cozy, satisfying dinner!

Close up side shot of two bowls of red wine braised beef with mashed potatoes, bread, and fresh herbs on top.

Braised Beef Roast

This red wine braised beef roast cooks low and slow in a Dutch oven until it’s tender, succulent, and full of rich flavor. The affordable, tough cut of meat breaks down and becomes fall-apart tender, blending easily into the bold red wine tomato sauce. It’s a classic dish that’s perfect for a quiet Sunday supper with family, and also fancy enough for entertaining.

What is braised beef?

Braising (also called “pot roasting”) is a low and slow cooking method that begins with dry heat and ends with moist heat. First, the beef is seared at a high temperature in a heavy-bottomed Dutch oven to attain a caramelized crust (dry heat). Next, the pot is covered, and the beef finishes cooking in liquid at a lower temperature (moist heat).

Overhead image of hands holding a bowl of mashed potatoes and braised beef roast.

What kind of beef is used for braised beef?

Braising is ideal for tenderizing less tender – and typically less expensive – cuts of beef. Generally, cuts from the chuck (the front section of the animal), the shank and brisket (the lower front sections), and the round (the back section), are the most suitable for braising and stewing. These are the parts of the animal that work the hardest, and therefore have the most tough connective tissue. The slow cooking method helps soften and tenderize the muscle fibers and connective tissue, resulting in moist, flavorful beef!

Here we’re using a boneless chuck roast, which has great marbling, making the roast tender and juicy when braised. Chuck roast is cut from the shoulder just above the short rib, so it’s tougher (and therefore more affordable) than those cut from the front part of the animal, like the sirloin or short loin.

Seared chuck roast on a plate.

Ingredients

This is a quick overview of the ingredients that you’ll need for this delicious braised beef recipe. As always, specific measurements and complete cooking instructions are included in the printable recipe box at the bottom of the post.

  • Boneless chuck roast: about 3 lbs. total, cut into very large chunks, which makes it cook slightly faster and makes it easier to shred at the end.
  • Kosher salt and black pepper: to season the meat and enhance the other flavors in the dish.
  • All-purpose flour: creates a dry surface on the meat that helps it caramelize when seared. The small amount of flour in the pot also helps to thicken the sauce slightly.
  • Butter and olive oil: to sear the meat. The caramelized surface gives the beef extra flavor, while the browned bits and drippings in the pot add even more richness to the sauce.
  • Onions and garlic: to flavor the meat and sauce as it cooks.
  • Rosemary, thyme, and oregano: give the sauce and beef even more savory, earthy flavor.
  • Tomato paste: adds a rich tomato flavor.
  • Whole peeled tomatoes: San Marzano tomatoes are my top choice for the best flavor.
  • Dry red wine: such as Cabernet Sauvignon, Pinot Noir, Burgundy or Cotes du Rhone.
  • Beef broth or beef stock: additional liquid for braising the meat.
  • Brown sugar: a hint of sweetness balances the acidity in the tomatoes and gives the dish a more complex flavor.
  • Soy sauce: just a touch of salty, umami flavor adds complexity.
Pouring red wine into a Dutch oven.

How to Braise Beef

The key to tender, fall-apart braised beef is time. The low-and-slow cooking process allows the tough fibers and collagen (connective tissue) to break down, while the fat keeps the beef moist and juicy. Just be patient and let the stovetop do its job for a couple of hours!

  1. Pat beef dry, season with salt and pepper, and toss to coat in flour.
  2. Sear the meat over medium-high heat until nicely browned; remove to a plate.
  3. Sauté onions, garlic, and herbs.
  4. Stir in tomato paste, tomatoes, red wine, beef broth, brown sugar, and soy sauce.
  5. Return the meat to the pot; bring the liquid to a simmer.
  6. Reduce the heat to low, cover the pot, and gently simmer until the meat is very fork tender, about 1 ½ – 2 hours.
  7. Remove the lid and vigorously simmer the sauce for 15-20 minutes, so that it thickens slightly.
  8. Shred the meat with two forks, stir it back into the sauce, and then season with salt and pepper, to taste.
Square shot of two bowls of braised beef with mashed potatoes.

What to Serve with Braised Beef

Serve the braised beef roast on top of sour cream and chive mashed potatoes, or alongside au gratin potatoestwice baked potatoes, or Aunt Bee’s 3-ingredient cheesy potato casserole. Alternatively, try pairing the meat and red wine sauce with egg noodles, a crusty loaf of breadflaky biscuits or skillet cornbread.

For a lighter vegetable to round out the meal, I recommend a simple green salad with red wine vinaigrette, a classic Caesar saladroasted root vegetablesParmesan roasted cauliflower, or sautéed asparagus.

Hands holding a piece of bread and eating braised beef.

Make Ahead

Braise the meat up to 3 days in advance. Let the meat cool in the sauce, then store in an airtight container in the refrigerator. Reheat the sauce over low heat.

Storage

Cooked braised beef will keep in an airtight container in the refrigerator for 3-4 days, or in the freezer for up to 3 months.

Front shot of two bowls of braised beef on a dinner table.

Recipe Variations

  • For a non-alcoholic option, replace the red wine with extra beef broth.
  • We prefer chuck roast, but you can also use brisket or round roast in this recipe.
  • Add diced carrots or celery to the pan at the same time that you add the onions.
  • Bay leaves are also a nice addition to the sauce. Just remove the bay leaves from the pot at the end of cooking.
  • Fresh herbs are best, but you can substitute with a smaller amount of dried herbs in a pinch.
  • Slow Cooker Method: instead of a Dutch oven, cook the roast in a Crock Pot. To do so, sear the meat in a skillet, cook the onions, garlic, and herbs as instructed. Cook the tomato paste for 1 minute, stir in the tomatoes (and juices), red wine, beef broth, brown sugar, and soy sauce. Use a wooden spoon to scrape up any browned bits, and then transfer the entire mixture to a slow cooker. Add the seared beef, cover with a lid, and cook on LOW for 8-10 hours or on HIGH for 4-5 hours. If the sauce is too thin, you might need to simmer it on the stovetop without a lid to reduce, or cook for 30-60 minutes on HIGH in the slow cooker without the lid at the very end. Shred the meat with two forks, stir it back into the sauce, and serve.

Tips for the Best Braised Beef Recipe

  • Brown the meat. This is an extra step, but it’s worth the effort. The caramelized surface gives the beef extra flavor, while the browned bits and drippings in the pot add even more flavor to the sauce.
  • When the beef is done braising, it should be fall-apart tender. It’s important to cook the beef long enough to break down the tough connective tissue and fibers. If your meat is still tough after about 1 ½ – 2 hours, continue simmering for a little bit longer.
  • Use a dry red wine such as Cabernet Sauvignon, Pinot Noir, Burgundy, or Cotes du Rhone. Nothing too sweet!
  • Keep the Dutch oven covered while braising in order to trap moisture in the pot. You should end up with a lovely, rich sauce at the end. If you find that the sauce is too thin, just simmer uncovered for a bit longer so that it can reduce and thicken.
Fork taking a bite of braised beef with mashed potatoes.

More Braised Beef Recipes to Try

Close up side shot of two bowls of red wine braised beef with mashed potatoes, bread, and fresh herbs on top.

Braised Beef with Red Wine and Tomatoes

5 from 1 vote
Prep: 30 minutes
Cook: 3 hours
Total: 3 hours 30 minutes
Servings 6 people
Calories 574 kcal
Similar to a beef ragù, this braised beef with red wine and tomatoes is classic comfort food! Serve it with mashed potatoes, noodles, or a loaf of crusty bread for a cozy, satisfying dinner.

Ingredients
  

  • 1 (3 lb.) boneless chuck roast, cut into large 3 x 4-inch chunks
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
  • ¼ cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 4 small onions, sliced
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced or pressed
  • 2 sprigs fresh rosemary (or ¼ teaspoon dried)
  • 2 sprigs fresh thyme (or ¼ teaspoon dried)
  • 1 sprig fresh oregano (or ¼ teaspoon dried)
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 1 (28 ounce) can whole peeled San Marzano tomatoes
  • 1 ½ cups dry red wine
  • 1 cup beef broth
  • 1 tablespoon brown sugar
  • 1 tablespoon soy sauce
  • Optional, for serving: mashed potatoes, noodles, rice, or crusty bread
  • Optional garnish: chopped fresh herbs such as basil, parsley, or thyme

Instructions

  • Pat beef dry. Season liberally with salt and pepper; toss to coat in flour, shaking off any excess flour.
  • Heat butter and oil in a large Dutch oven over medium-high heat until it is hot but not smoking. Working in batches, if necessary, so that you don’t overcrowd the pan, brown the meat, turning occasionally, to give it nice color on all sides (about 8-10 minutes per batch). Transfer the meat to a plate.
  • Add onions, garlic, and herbs to the drippings in the pot. Cook, stirring often, until onions begin to brown, 4-6 minutes. Stir in the tomato paste and cook for 1 more minute.
  • Add tomatoes and their juices, crushing the tomatoes with your hands as you add them to the pot.
  • Stir in the red wine, beef broth, brown sugar, and soy sauce. Use a wooden spoon to scrape up any browned bits from the bottom of the pot as you stir.
  • Return meat to the pot, along with any juices from the plate, stirring it into the onion mixture. Bring the liquid to a simmer.
  • Reduce the heat to low so that the liquid is gently simmering. Cover the pot and cook at a gentle simmer until the meat is very tender when pierced with a fork, 1 ½ – 2 hours.
  • Remove the lid. Increase the heat to medium-high, and simmer vigorously until the sauce thickens, 15-20 minutes.
  • Remove the meat from the pot and shred; discard any big fatty pieces. Discard herb stems. Stir the shredded meat back into the sauce. Taste and season with salt and pepper.

Notes

  • Brown the meat. This is an extra step, but it’s worth the effort. The caramelized surface gives the beef extra flavor, while the browned bits and drippings in the pot add even more flavor to the sauce.
  • When the beef is done braising, it should be fall-apart tender. It’s important to cook the beef long enough to break down the tough connective tissue and fibers. If your meat is still tough after about 1 ½ – 2 hours, continue simmering for a little bit longer.
  • Use a dry red wine such as Cabernet Sauvignon, Pinot Noir, Burgundy, or Cotes du Rhone. Nothing too sweet!
  • Keep the Dutch oven covered while braising in order to trap moisture in the pot. You should end up with a lovely, rich sauce at the end. If you find that the sauce is too thin, just simmer uncovered for a bit longer so that it can reduce and thicken.
  • For a non-alcoholic option, replace the red wine with extra beef broth.
  • We prefer chuck roast, but you can also use brisket or round roast in this recipe.
  • Slow Cooker Method: instead of a Dutch oven, cook the roast in a Crock Pot. To do so, sear the meat in a skillet, cook the onions, garlic, and herbs as instructed. Cook the tomato paste for 1 minute, stir in the tomatoes (and juices), red wine, beef broth, brown sugar, and soy sauce. Use a wooden spoon to scrape up any browned bits, and then transfer the entire mixture to a slow cooker. Add the seared beef, cover with a lid, and cook on LOW for 8-10 hours or on HIGH for 4-5 hours.

Nutrition

Serving: 1/6 of the recipeCalories: 574kcalCarbohydrates: 19gProtein: 47gFat: 31gSaturated Fat: 13gPolyunsaturated Fat: 3gMonounsaturated Fat: 16gTrans Fat: 2gCholesterol: 162mgSodium: 673mgPotassium: 1199mgFiber: 3gSugar: 9gVitamin A: 325IUVitamin C: 19mgCalcium: 106mgIron: 7mg
Keyword: braised beef, braised beef roast
Course: Dinner
Cuisine: American
Author: Blair Lonergan
blair

Hey, I’m Blair!

Welcome to my farmhouse kitchen in the foothills of Virginia’s Blue Ridge Mountains. Inspired by local traditions and seasonal fare, you’ll find plenty of easy, comforting recipes that bring your family together around the table. It’s down-home, country-style cooking!

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Comments

  1. 5 stars
    I made this for dinner last night and I have to tell you it was absolutley delicious. Thanks for another great recipe ~ Karen