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This Southern Peach Blueberry Cobbler is the best way to enjoy fresh summer fruit! The warm filling is topped with light, buttery biscuits for a special breakfast or an easy dessert. Don’t forget a scoop of vanilla ice cream on top of this classic, old-fashioned treat!

Close overhead shot of peach blueberry cobbler in a cast iron skillet

You can’t beat a rustic dessert with fresh fruit during the warm summer months. This peach blueberry cobbler recipe is made from scratch, comes together quickly, and is a lovely way to showcase the season’s best produce. And if you don’t have access to fresh fruit, no worries — frozen berries and frozen peaches will also work. I honestly can’t think of a better ending to your next summer meal!

Old Fashioned Peach and Blueberry Cobbler

An old-fashioned cobbler is a rustic dessert that’s made with a fruit filling (in this case blueberries and peaches) and covered with a batter or biscuit topping before baking. In some cases, the batter is thinner, so it soaks down into the berries and forms a cake-like texture around the fruit. You can find this delicious version in my Blackberry Cobbler or my Bisquick Peach Cobbler. You’ll also see cobbler recipes that use canned fruit, pie filling, Bisquick mix, or even a box of cake mix!

By contrast, this easy blueberry peach cobbler includes a made-from-scratch biscuit topping, which is thicker than the batter version and therefore sits on top of the fruit filling. The biscuits are slightly sweet (taste a lot like scones), spread a bit in the oven to cover the filling, and turn a flaky, buttery golden brown. Paired with a warm and juicy filling, this not-too-sweet dish works well for both breakfast and dessert. Now you have two excuses to enjoy the summer treat!

Horizontal overhead shot of easy blueberry peach cobbler on a plate with vanilla ice cream

What’s the difference between a cobbler and a crisp or crumble?

A cobbler should not be confused with a crisp or a crumble, which are also desserts that feature fruit like peaches, apples and berries. Crumbles and crisps are very similar, as they both include a fruit base with a streusel topping. Originally, an old fashioned crisp would contain oats in the topping, while a peach blueberry crumble would not. These days, the words “crumble” and “crisp” are often used interchangeably when referring to these desserts. A cobbler, by contrast, is a fruit dessert with a biscuit or cake-like topping (no streusel).

Do peaches need to be soft for cobbler?

No, you don’t want super-soft peaches for a cobbler. You’re looking for sweet, ripe fruit that’s still slightly firm. If the peaches are too soft, they will break down into mush when baked. A little bit of texture is good!

Frozen sliced peaches are a great alternative to fresh peaches in this dish. I do not recommend using canned peaches, since they are very soft and will not hold up as well.

Can you make peach cobbler without peeling the peaches?

Yes, you can make the cobbler without peeling the fruit. It’s really a matter of personal preference! If you don’t mind some chewier texture from the peel, feel free to leave it on. Personally, I like to use peeled peaches for this dish.

Overhead image of biscuit topped peach cobbler with blueberries in a cast iron skillet

Ingredients

This is a quick overview of the simple ingredients that you’ll need for a peach and blueberry cobbler. As always, specific measurements and step-by-step instructions are included in the printable recipe box at the bottom of the post.

  • Peaches: peeled and sliced fresh or frozen peaches will both work well here. I do not recommend canned peaches for this recipe, since they’re very soft and will break down too much in the oven.
  • Blueberries: fresh or frozen berries are a perfect companion for peaches.
  • Granulated sugar: adds a hint of sweetness to both the filling and the topping.
  • Lemon juice and zest: the acid in the lemon juice balances the sweetness of the fruit. The lemon flavor in the zest also helps to enhance and bring out the fruit’s natural flavor.
  • Cornstarch: the thickening agent that prevents a runny peach cobbler.
  • All-purpose flour: the base of the biscuit topping.
  • Baking powder: the leavening agent that helps the biscuits rise.
  • Salt: enhances the other flavors in the biscuits.
  • Butter: for great flavor! Make sure that it’s very cold for flaky biscuits.
  • Buttermilk: for its acidity, as well as its fat and liquid content. In conjunction with the baking powder, the acidity helps the biscuits rise. The buttermilk also gives the biscuits a nice, subtle tanginess and a tender crumb. Keep the buttermilk nice and cold before adding it to the dough.
  • Coarse sugar: adds a sweet, crunchy finish to the biscuit topping. Such great texture!
Overhead image of a skillet of Southern peach blueberry cobbler on a white table with a blue and white cloth napkin

How to Make Peach Blueberry Cobbler

You can mix peaches and blueberries in a cobbler for a quick and easy dessert that will satisfy any craving! Let’s get started…

  1. Stir together the filling, then let it rest for 10-20 minutes while the sugars release some juices.
  2. Transfer the filling to a 12-inch cast iron skillet or a 9 x 13-inch baking dish.
  3. Stir together the biscuit topping.
  4. Divide the dough in 8 even dollops on top of the fruit filling, and sprinkle with coarse sugar.
  5. Bake the cobbler in a 425° F oven for about 25-30 minutes.
  6. Let rest for 5-10 minutes, then enjoy!
Peaches and blueberries in a bowl
Peaches and blueberries in a cast iron skillet
Biscuit dough in bowl
Process shot showing how to make southern peach blueberry cobbler in a cast iron skillet
Square overhead image of peach blueberry cobbler recipe baked in a cast iron skillet

How to Serve Southern Peach Blueberry Cobbler

This recipe is best when served warm. You can offer it for breakfast or brunch with a side of thick, creamy Greek yogurt or a splash of cream. You can also serve the cobbler for dessert, in which case it’s best with a scoop of vanilla ice cream or a dollop of freshly whipped cream.

Close up side shot of southern peach blueberry cobbler on a plate with ice cream

Storage

If you’d like, you can make the cobbler ahead of time and serve it at room temperature or reheat it just before serving. The cobbler will stay fresh when covered at room temperature for up to 12 hours. If you’d like to keep the cobbler fresh longer, you can store the cobbler in the refrigerator for 4-5 days, or keep it wrapped tightly in the freezer for up to 2 months.

To Reheat

Preheat the oven to 350° F. Cover loosely with foil and bake until warm (about 20 minutes). You can also microwave individual servings of cobbler for 20-30 seconds, or just until warm.

Recipe Variations

  • Use fresh or frozen peaches and blueberries in this cobbler recipe. If you’re using frozen fruit, do not thaw the fruit first. The frozen fruit filling will be more saucy and juicy, but it’s still great. You can also thicken it up a bit by increasing the cornstarch to 3 tablespoons. You will likely need to increase the baking time by a few minutes as well.
  • Swap out the blueberries and use any other berries with the peaches. Blackberries, raspberries or diced strawberries would all be delicious additions to the cobbler filling.
  • Instead of lemon juice and zest, try using orange juice and orange zest in the filling for a slightly different citrus flavor.
  • Don’t have buttermilk? You can make your own buttermilk for the biscuit topping using regular milk and lemon juice. To do so, stir 2 teaspoons of lemon juice into ⅓ cup of milk. Let sit for a few minutes in the refrigerator, and then use in the recipe as a substitute for the buttermilk.
Overhead image of old fashioned peach and blueberry cobbler on a plate on a white table

Tips for the Best Peach Blueberry Cobbler Recipe

  • Allow the fruit filling to sit and rest for 10-20 minutes before assembling the cobbler. The sugar will release some of the fruit’s juices, which you want to include in the skillet when you prepare the dessert.
  • The butter and buttermilk need to be as cold as possible for flaky and tender biscuits. You can freeze the cubed butter for about 10-20 minutes before using it or keep it in the refrigerator. I also keep the buttermilk in the refrigerator right up until it’s time to add it to the dough.
  • The dollops of biscuit dough on top of the fruit do not need to be perfect. The dough will spread in the oven to cover most of the filling, and we’re going for a “rustic” look!
  • The cobbler is done when the filling is bubbly and the biscuits are cooked through. Make sure that the biscuits are totally cooked through by sticking a toothpick in the center of one. If it comes out clean, you’ll know they’re fully set. When starting with frozen fruit, you may need to add about 5 extra minutes to the total baking time.
  • If the tops of the biscuits start to get too dark before they are completely cooked through, you can tent the dish loosely with foil during the final few minutes of baking.
Close overhead shot of old fashioned peach blueberry cobbler in a skillet with vanilla ice cream on top

More Peach and Blueberry Recipes to Try

Close overhead shot of peach blueberry cobbler in a cast iron skillet

Peach Blueberry Cobbler

Prep: 30 minutes
Cook: 30 minutes
Cooling Time 5 minutes
Total: 1 hour 5 minutes
Servings 8 people
Calories 295 kcal
This Southern Peach Blueberry Cobbler is the best way to enjoy fresh summer fruit! Don't forget a scoop of vanilla ice cream on top for a classic, old-fashioned treat!

Ingredients
  

For the Filling:

  • 6-8 cups peeled and sliced fresh peaches (about 7-8 medium peaches) (or about 2 lbs. frozen, sliced peaches)
  • 2 cups fresh blueberries (or substitute with frozen blueberries)
  • cup granulated sugar
  • Grated zest and juice of 1 lemon
  • 2 ½ tablespoons cornstarch

For the Topping:

  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • ½ cup granulated sugar
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 6 tablespoons (¾ stick) cold salted butter, cubed
  • cup cold buttermilk, or more if needed
  • Coarse sugar
  • Optional, for serving: vanilla ice cream

Instructions

  • Preheat oven to 425°.

Prepare the Filling:

  • In a large bowl, combine peaches, blueberries, sugar, lemon zest, lemon juice and cornstarch. Let the mixture sit for 10-20 minutes.
  • Transfer the peach mixture to a 12-inch cast iron skillet or a 9 x 13-inch baking dish.

Prepare the Topping:

  • In a medium bowl, whisk together the flour, granulated sugar, baking powder and salt. Using a pastry blender, fork, or your fingers, work in the butter until it’s in pea-sized pieces. Add the buttermilk, stirring gently just until dough forms. If the mixture seems too dry, stir in a little bit more buttermilk.
  • Drop 8 biscuit-sized dollops of the mixture on top of the peaches. Sprinkle with coarse sugar.
  • Bake until the top is golden brown and the filling is bubbly, about 25-30 minutes for fresh fruit (or 30-35 minutes for frozen fruit). Let rest for 5-10 minutes. Serve with ice cream, if desired.

Notes

  • Allow the fruit filling to sit and rest for 10-20 minutes before assembling the cobbler. The sugar will release some of the fruit’s juices, which you want to include in the skillet when you prepare the dessert.
  • The butter and buttermilk need to be as cold as possible for flaky and tender biscuits. You can freeze the cubed butter for about 10-20 minutes before using it or keep it in the refrigerator. I also keep the buttermilk in the refrigerator right up until it’s time to add it to the dough.
  • The dollops of biscuit dough on top of the fruit do not need to be perfect. The dough will spread in the oven to cover most of the filling, and we’re going for a “rustic” look!
  • The cobbler is done when the filling is bubbly and the biscuits are cooked through. Make sure that the biscuits are totally cooked through by sticking a toothpick in the center of one. If it comes out clean, you’ll know they’re fully set. If starting with frozen fruit, you may need to add about 5 extra minutes to the total baking time.
  • If the tops of the biscuits start to get too dark before they are completely cooked through, you can tent the dish loosely with foil during the final few minutes of baking.
  • You can use fresh or frozen peaches and blueberries in this cobbler recipe. If you’re using frozen fruit, do not thaw the fruit first. The frozen fruit filling will be more saucy and juicy, but it’s still great. You can also thicken it up a bit by increasing the corn starch to 3 tablespoons. You will likely need to increase the baking time by a few minutes, too.
  • Swap out the blueberries and use any berries with the peaches. Blackberries, raspberries or diced strawberries would all be delicious additions to the cobbler filling.
  • Instead of lemon juice and zest, try using orange juice and orange zest in the filling for a slightly different citrus flavor.
  • Don’t have buttermilk? You can make your own buttermilk for the biscuit topping using regular milk and lemon juice. To do so, stir 2 teaspoons of lemon juice into ⅓ cup of milk. Let sit for a few minutes in the refrigerator, and then use in the recipe as a substitute for the buttermilk.

Nutrition

Serving: 1/8 of the cobblerCalories: 295kcalCarbohydrates: 52gProtein: 3gFat: 9gSaturated Fat: 6gTrans Fat: 1gCholesterol: 24mgSodium: 232mgPotassium: 332mgFiber: 3gSugar: 35gVitamin A: 675IUVitamin C: 11mgCalcium: 48mgIron: 1mg
Keyword: easy blueberry peach cobbler, old fashioned peach and blueberry cobbler, peach blueberry cobbler
Course: Breakfast, Brunch, Dessert
Cuisine: American, Southern
Author: Blair Lonergan
blair

Hey, I’m Blair!

Welcome to my farmhouse kitchen in the foothills of Virginia’s Blue Ridge Mountains. Inspired by local traditions and seasonal fare, you’ll find plenty of easy, comforting recipes that bring your family together around the table. It’s down-home, country-style cooking!

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