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This easy and rustic peach galette is the perfect summer dessert! Use a store-bought Pillsbury pie crust or make your own from scratch — the simple free-form pie is delicious either way. You’ll love the combination of ripe, juicy peaches, warm spices and flaky pastry with cool vanilla ice cream on top!

Overhead image of a spiced rustic peach galette on a green wooden table

While it might look and sound fancy, a peach galette is really just an easier, more rustic version of a peach pie! You don’t need to make your own crust from scratch, and you don’t even need a pie plate. There’s no better way to take advantage of fresh summer fruit!

What is the difference between a galette and a pie?

A pie is a sweet (or savory) dish with a crust and a filling. The sides of a pie dish are sloped, and the pie can have a bottom and a top crust, just a bottom crust, or just a top crust. The flaky pastry is usually made with flour, salt, cold water, and butter or shortening, and the pie is served directly from its baking dish.

While a galette also includes a flaky pastry crust filled with fruit, it differs from a pie mainly in the way that it’s baked. The galette is a French pastry similar to a tart or pie; however, instead of baking a galette in a pie plate, the galette is “free form,” meaning that it’s just baked on a flat sheet pan. It only has a bottom crust. This gives the galette a more rustic look and feel — and it’s virtually impossible to “mess up.” You don’t have to worry about crimping the edges, creating a lattice top, or blind-baking with pie weights!

What is the difference between a tart and a galette?

Technically, a tart has a shallow, straight-sided pastry crust that is filled before or after baking, and has no top crust. You need a special tart pan (as opposed to a pie plate) to achieve the classic straight sides. By contrast, the galette doesn’t require a special pan and doesn’t have sides at all.

As explained above, the term galette primarily refers to rustic, free-form tarts made with a single crust of pastry or bread dough. Italian cooks use the term crostata in place of galette. No matter what you call it, this fresh, simple, sweet dessert is always delicious!

Is galette dough the same as pie dough?

Yes, the galette crust is made with a classic pie pastry. You can use a store-bought Pillsbury pie crust for a shortcut (like my mom!), or you can make your favorite pie crust from scratch. You can find my go-to all-butter pie crust recipe below. If using a box of store-bought crust, freeze the second crust in the Pillsbury package to use at a later date.

Close overhead image of a slice of peach galette with store bought crust on a server

Ingredients

This is just a quick overview of the ingredients that you’ll need for a homemade peach galette. As always, specific measurements and complete cooking instructions are included in the printable recipe box at the bottom of the post.

  • Pastry for a single pie crust: use my homemade recipe below or substitute with a store-bought Pillsbury pie crust.
  • Egg wash: an egg mixed with water helps the edges of the crust turn a beautiful golden brown.
  • Coarse sugar: gives the crust a crisp, flavorful exterior.
  • Peaches: about 3 cups of sliced, fresh peaches. There’s no need to peel them first!
  • Granulated sugar: to sweeten the filling.
  • Lemon juice and zest: for a bright, acidic note that balances the sweetness of the fruit and enhances the peaches’ natural flavor.
  • Cornstarch: the thickening agent that absorbs some of the fruit’s juices and helps to prevent a soggy crust.
  • Cinnamon and ginger: warm spices that pair nicely with peaches.
  • Salt: to balance the sweetness of the dessert.
  • Apricot jam, peach jam or peach jelly: helps the fruit shine.

How to Make a Peach Galette

This easy peach galette is basically just the lazy gal’s rendition of a peach pie. You get all of the flavor and all of the ingredients that you love in a classic pie…with half of the work!

  1. Prepare the pie crust if you’re using a homemade dough, then chill for at least 1 hour.
  2. Roll out the pie crust so that it measures about 12 inches in diameter.
  3. Transfer the dough to a parchment-lined rimmed baking sheet, then chill.
  4. Toss together the filling.
  5. Pile the filling in the center of the dough.
  6. Fold the pastry over the fruit along the edges.
  7. Brush the crust with egg wash and sprinkle with coarse sugar.
Pie crust on a baking sheet
Bowl of peach pie filling
Process shot showing how to make peach galette
Brushing pastry crust with egg wash

How Long to Bake the Rustic Peach Galette

Bake the rustic, free-form tart in a 400° F oven for 35-45 minutes. You’ll know that it’s done when the peaches are tender, the filling bubbles a little bit, and the crust is golden brown.

As soon as the galette comes out of the oven, brush the peaches with a little bit of jam to give them a glossy, shiny finish.

Brushing peach jam on a baked peach galette
Side shot of a server lifting a slice of the best peach galette recipe

How to Serve this Easy Peach Galette

The galette slices most easily if you allow it too cool for about an hour before serving. Cut into triangles and top each wedge with whipped cream or a scoop of vanilla ice cream for a real treat!

Overhead shot of two slices of peach galette on plates with ice cream

Storage

  • You can make a galette ahead of time, so it’s a very convenient dessert (especially if you’re entertaining).
  • If serving on the same day that you bake the galette, just store it at room temperature.
  • Covered, the galette will last in the refrigerator for 3-4 days (although the crust may get soggy after about 24 hours).
  • Freeze leftover galette for up to 3 months. Thaw in the refrigerator overnight.
  • How to Reheat: Place the galette on a baking sheet and warm in a 375° F oven for about 10 minutes. The microwave will work for individual slices, but the crust won’t stay as crispy.
Overhead image of a sliced easy peach galette with Pillsbury pie crust and fresh summer peaches

How do I keep my galette from getting soggy?

The cornstarch in the filling absorbs and thickens the juices that the peaches release as they bake — therefore preventing a soggy galette. If you find that your peaches are exceptionally ripe and juicy, I recommend using 4 tablespoons of cornstarch (and maybe even straining off some of the excess juice before preparing the filling). If your fruit isn’t quite as juicy, you can decrease the cornstarch to just 3 tablespoons.

Can frozen peaches be used?

I have not tested this recipe with frozen (or thawed) peaches. You may end up with a soggy crust on your galette since frozen fruit tends to be more watery than fresh fruit. If you want to experiment with frozen peaches, I recommend increasing the cornstarch called for in the recipe.

Recipe Variations

  • If you don’t want to make your own pie crust from scratch, I recommend using a store-bought Pillsbury refrigerated pie crust (that’s what my mom does)! The package comes with two crusts, and you only need one for this recipe. Freeze the extra crust for another recipe.
  • Berries: substitute fresh blueberries, blackberries, strawberries, or raspberries for some of the peaches called for in the recipe. You’ll just need to make sure that you have a total of about 3 cups of fruit.
  • Plums: swap out some of the peaches and use fresh plums as well.
  • Herbs: garnish the galette with earthy, savory herbs for a nice contrast to the sweet fruit. Good options include fresh rosemary and thyme.
  • Spices: for a more prominent spiced peach galette, increase the cinnamon and ginger called for in this recipe. You might also like to include a dash of nutmeg, cardamom or cloves.
Close up side shot of a rustic peach galette garnished with fresh thyme

Tips for the Best Peach Galette Recipe

  • Cut the peaches into thin, uniform slices so that they bake evenly.
  • It’s not necessary to skin the peaches before adding them to your filling. The peach skin is tender and will help hold the shape of the peaches as they bake.
  • I do not recommend using canned or frozen peaches for this recipe. Canned fruit will not hold its shape as well in the baking process, and the frozen fruit tends to release a lot more liquid (which can result in a soggy crust). This is one of those summer treats that’s best enjoyed when the in-season fruit is ripe and flavorful!
  • Cornstarch helps thicken the filling (so that you don’t have a soggy, wet mess in the middle), so don’t omit this important ingredient.
Overhead image of a sliced rustic peach galette on a green surface

More Recipes with Fresh Peaches

Overhead image of a spiced rustic peach galette on a green wooden table

Peach Galette

Prep: 20 minutes
Cook: 35 minutes
Cooling Time 1 hour
Total: 1 hour 55 minutes
Servings 6 – 8 people
Calories 266 kcal
This easy and rustic peach galette is the perfect summer dessert! Use a store-bought Pillsbury pie crust or make your own from scratch — this simple free-form pie is delicious either way!

Ingredients
  

FOR THE CRUST (or use store-bought crust):

  • 1 ¼ cups all-purpose flour (150 grams)
  • ½ cup (1 stick) cold salted butter, cut into ½-inch cubes
  • ¼ cup ice water, plus more as needed
  • Egg wash (1 egg mixed with 1 tablespoon of water), reserve for assembly
  • Coarse sugar, for topping

FOR THE FILLING:

  • 3 cups sliced fresh peaches
  • ½ cup granulated sugar
  • Juice and grated zest of ½ lemon
  • 4 tablespoons cornstarch (or decrease to 3 tablespoons if your peaches aren’t very juicy)
  • ½ teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • ¼ teaspoon ground ginger
  • Pinch of salt
  • ¼ cup apricot jam, peach jam or peach jelly
  • Optional, for serving: vanilla ice cream or whipped cream

Instructions

MAKE THE CRUST (or use store-bought crust):

  • Place the flour in a large bowl. Add the cold, cubed butter, tossing the cubes through the flour until each piece is well coated. Use your fingers or a pastry cutter to cut the butter into the flour just until the pieces of butter are about the size of peas.
  • Make a well in the center of the flour mixture. Add the ice water; use your hands or a fork to toss the flour mixture with the water until the dough comes together. Do not knead. Add more water, 1 tablespoon at a time, until the dough is properly hydrated (it shouldn’t be sticky, but it should hold together and you shouldn’t see any dry pockets of flour).
  • Press the dough into a 1-inch thick disc. Wrap tightly in plastic wrap and refrigerate for about 1 hour, or up to 2 days. You can also freeze the disc of pie dough for up to 3 months.

ROLL OUT THE PIE CRUST:

  • If the pie dough is really cold and firm, let it rest on the counter for about 10-15 minutes before rolling.
  • On a floured work surface, roll out the disc of chilled dough. Turn the dough about a quarter turn after every few rolls until you have a circle that measures 12 inches in diameter. Carefully transfer the dough to a rimmed baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Cover with plastic wrap and place the crust back in the refrigerator to chill while you preheat the oven and make the filling.

MAKE THE FILLING:

  • Preheat oven to 400° F.
  • In a large bowl, toss together peaches, sugar, lemon juice, lemon zest, cornstarch, cinnamon, ginger and salt.

ASSEMBLE THE GALETTE:

  • Arrange the filling in the center of the dough, leaving a 1 ½-inch border. Gently fold the pastry over the fruit, pleating to hold it in. Brush the crust with egg wash; sprinkle with coarse sugar.
  • Bake in the 400° F oven for 30-35 minutes, or until the filling bubbles and the crust is golden brown.
  • Warm the jam in a small saucepan over low heat until it’s a nice, thin consistency. Brush the peaches with the jam. Cut the galette into 6-8 slices. Top each slice with vanilla ice cream or whipped cream, if desired.

Notes

  • If you don’t want to make your own pie crust from scratch, I recommend using a store-bought Pillsbury refrigerated pie crust (that’s what my mom does)! The package comes with two crusts, and you only need one for this recipe. Freeze the extra crust for another recipe.
  • Berries: substitute fresh blueberries, blackberries, strawberries, or raspberries for some of the peaches called for in the recipe. You’ll just need to make sure that you have a total of about 3 cups of fruit.
  • Plums: swap out some of the peaches and use fresh plums as well.
  • Herbs: garnish the galette with earthy, savory herbs for a nice contrast to the sweet fruit. Good options include fresh rosemary and thyme.
  • Spices: for a more prominent spiced peach galette, increase the cinnamon and ginger called for in this recipe. You might also like to include a dash of nutmeg, cardamom or cloves.
  • Cut the peaches into thin, uniform slices so that they bake evenly.
  • It’s not necessary to skin the peaches before adding them to your filling. The peach skin is tender and will help hold the shape of the peaches as they bake.
  • I do not recommend using canned or frozen peaches for this recipe. Canned fruit will not hold its shape as well in the baking process, and the frozen fruit tends to release a lot more liquid (which can result in a soggy crust). This is one of those summer treats that’s best enjoyed when the in-season fruit is ripe and flavorful!
  • Cornstarch helps thicken the filling (so that you don’t have a soggy, wet mess in the middle), so don’t omit this important ingredient.

Nutrition

Serving: 1slice (when cut into 8 slices)Calories: 266kcalCarbohydrates: 38gProtein: 3gFat: 12gSaturated Fat: 7gPolyunsaturated Fat: 1gMonounsaturated Fat: 3gTrans Fat: 1gCholesterol: 31mgSodium: 103mgPotassium: 138mgFiber: 2gSugar: 18gVitamin A: 548IUVitamin C: 4mgCalcium: 12mgIron: 1mg
Keyword: easy, peach galette, rustic
Course: Dessert
Cuisine: American
Author: Blair Lonergan
blair

Hey, I’m Blair!

Welcome to my farmhouse kitchen in the foothills of Virginia’s Blue Ridge Mountains. Inspired by local traditions and seasonal fare, you’ll find plenty of easy, comforting recipes that bring your family together around the table. It’s down-home, country-style cooking!

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